Zero Point of Via Transilvanica trail inaugurated at Putna Monastery

Via Transilvanica’s kilometre-zero reference point was inaugurated in July at Putna Monastery marking the start of a 950 km long route that encourages people to walk and rediscover Romania’s landmarks from the mountain ridges to Danube’s shores.

The trail connects Putna Monastery, where the tomb of Ruler Prince Saint Stephen the Great is located, and Drobeta Turnu Severin, the city where Romania’s first King Carol I entered the country in 1866.

Following the inauguration ceremony on July 22, the V. Rev. Archimandrite Melchisedec Velnic, the abbot of Putna Monastery, offered prayers for the blessing of all those who travel by land.

Alin Uhlmann Ușeriu, president of Tasuleasa Social Association, noted that the VT trail starts from Putna Monastery because one needs faith to walk on this path.

The route can be traveled either for several weeks in full length, or partially in a few days, depending on the traveler strength and desire.

Via Transilvanica’s infrastructure will provide information regarding accommodation and meals, as well as historical and cultural information about different geographical areas.

The road will be marked with specific identification elements, made of sustainable materials which will allow the traveller to navigate along the way. The most accurate information will be provided about the difficulty of the route.

‘I’m honoured to be in Putna today, in this space with profound meanings for the Romanian people. (…) I am convinced that Via Transilvanica will mean a lot to us and to future generations,’ said the Minister of Waters and Forests, Ioan Denes.

As an ambassador of Via Transilvanica, Tibi Ușeriu, winner of the 2018 Arctic Ultra Marathon, expressed his joy for the existence of such a route in Romania, adding that he will promote the trail in the international competitions where he will take part.

Surnamed ‘The road that unites’, Via Transilvanica was initiated by the Tășuleasa Social organization in 2018 to mark the 1918 Great Union Centennial.

Photography courtesy of Putna Monastery / Facebook

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